Friday, December 18, 2015

Friday Chrome Work

Welcome to the end of the week, and the start of some great work!

Tasks
1) upload Culture Vulture Researched Revised Response to turnitin.com [revised due date 12/21 3pm]

2) edit Gothic story on Write the World

3) review selections for Term 2 ROAR (research paper novel) on Amazon, Shmoop, ect.

4) memorize Poetry Out Poem, and sign up for poem presentation under PoL poster (OFF line)

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Poems, Gothic Story, Culture Vulture, and Film

Yesterday, we did amazing work with our poems. Your questions and reading (TPCASTT) made me appreciate lines and stanzas, and I hope you have a stronger understanding our your poem.

Many of you have asked about the Gothic Stories, and here are some of the best lines from your stories: HERE

To start the editing process, and encourage you to submit your work to the RUBIX literary magazine or Marble Collection, we are going to become part of the Write the World community.

Here is the ONE task to accomplish today!

Sign up for Write The World, and submit your Gothic Story!
1: check e-mail for an invitation (if it isn't there, and tell Mr. Doreian)
2: register for our class group
3: submit your Gothic Story


Here are tasks for the remainder of the period
1: memorize your poem
2: keep working on the TPCASTT chart
3: revise Culture Vulture Response to include research (RRR)
4: schedule time for film project (1 hour of framing/shooting, 3 hours of editing)
5: investigate book selections for Term 2 ROAR (amazon, goodreads, shmoop)

Monday, December 14, 2015

Key West Literary Seminar: Mr. Doreian's Amazing Culture Vulture














Last year I applied for a scholarship to attend the 2016 Key West Literary Seminar. I wrote a letter that introduced my teaching, indirectly introducing my students as well. Sharing how we read and write about life through Culture Vultures and ROAR, I described ELA 10 and all the wonderful work you accomplish.

And I won a teacher award.

So, as we start January I will be gone from Wednesday (1/6) through Sunday (1/10). This will be a chance for me to read, talk with authors, and visit Hemingway's home (six-toed cats!). For you, it is a chance to read much of your Term II ROAR novel.

Here is more about the seminar: http://www.kwls.org/seminar34/  and I will do some live tweeting using @ELA10Doreian #kwls

And there's this...

Friday, December 11, 2015

Gothic Stories

Sprint Write!

1) take out your Gothic/TKAM chart from Wednesday

2) compose a paragraph of Gothic narrative using at least 3 of the elements #1-5

3) identify your use of Gothic elements with citations: The back door, obscured by a tangled overgrowth of wisteria vine, hadn't been opened in over a decade (1). Children swore, though, that on full moon nights a strange glow would emanate from the door knocker (3).

4) conclude your paragraph with one of the "metonymy of gloom and horror" (element 6) examples

5) upload to Turnitin.com, copy and paste into you class Google Doc:



Wednesday, December 9, 2015

TKAM reading the final frames

Today we finish our reading of Robert Mulligan's To Kill a Mockingbird (1962).

1) skim over the description of Gothic Literature

2) read the final 25 minutes of the film (start @1:26:15)
 Netflix 
or

3) chart how Mulligan employs Gothic elements in the final scenes of the film

4) comment on this blog post to ask Mr. Doreian a question!

=========================================
SELECT YOUR POETRY OUT LOUD POEM

Monday, December 7, 2015

Exemplars for Culture Vulture Researched Revised Response

 Here are two Culture Vulture exemplars!

Follow the formatting and the style to make a solid Researched Revised Response.

One page!


 #1 


 #2 

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Saturday, November 21, 2015

How to connect Go Set a Watchman with To Kill A Mockingbird

As we conclude our reading of To Kill a Mockingbird, how do we make sense of Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman rough draft?

Here are my thoughts:

Quick Timeline1) Harper Lee writes GSAW, but publisher doesn't think the book will sell
2) GSAW become a rough draft of TKAM, which Harper Lee writes after returning to Alabama
3) The new book trades ambiguity and questions for nostalgia and simplicity to get published
How can I prove my thesis? 1) TKAM is a dual narrative, 1st person, reflection on the 1930's
2) GSAW is a 3rd person, present unpacking of the 1950's
Here's the thematic center of TKAM:"First of all," [Atticus] said, "if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you'll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view […] until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" (39)
Here's the thematic center of GSAW:“it’s always easy to look back and see what we were, yesterday, ten years ago. It is hard to see what we are. If you can master that trick, you’ll get along” (269)
Thesis Statement: 
Harper Lee adapted GSAW and its insistence to deal with the present into TKAM's saccharine reflection on sympathy.

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Hurling time!

Try not to be amazed at this sport.

Culture Vulture for life!


Thursday, October 22, 2015

Boston Book Festival!

Boston Book Festival!

Here are Mr. Doreian's "Choice Selections"

M. T. Anderson



M. T. Anderson is an author of stories for diverse audiences, from picture books for children to novels for teens and adults. His most notable works include Feed and the Octavian Nothing saga, for which he won a National Book Award. His latest book, Symphony for the City of the Dead, is a nonfiction account of the surprising intersections of art and war during World War II.
12:00PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY TEEN CENTRAL, 700 BOYLSTON STREET

Robin Brenner



Robin Brenner is the teen librarian at the Brookline Public Library. She started a graphic novel and comic review website, No Flying No Tights, while in library school at the University of Illinois, and since then has been involved in many aspects of graphic novels and libraries.
10:45AM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
EMMANUEL SANCTUARY, 15 NEWBURY STREET

Edwidge Danticat



Edwidge Danticat is the author of eleven books, includingBreath, Eyes, Memory, an Oprah Book Club selection, and the National Book Award-nominated story collection Krik? Krak! Her latest book is Untwine, a young adult novel Kirkushails as “an honest, endearing exploration of family, grief and perseverance.”
4:00PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
EMMANUEL SANCTUARY, 15 NEWBURY STREET

Matt de la Peña



Matt de la Peña is an award-winning YA and picture book author. His picture books include A Nation’s Hope and Last Stop on Market Street. He is also the author of six young adult novels, including his latest The Hunted (the sequel toThe Living).
1:30PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY CHILDREN’S LIBRARY, 700 BOYLSTON STREET
3:00PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY TEEN CENTRAL, 700 BOYLSTON STREET

Neil Gaiman



Neil Gaiman is a #1 New York Times–bestselling author for children and adults. He has won the Hugo, Nebula, and Bram Stoker awards, along with the Newbery and Carnegie medals. His most notable works include The Graveyard Book, The Sandman series, Stardust, American Gods, andCoraline. Gaiman’s most recent book is a collection of his shorter work titled Trigger Warning.
5:45PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
OLD SOUTH SANCTUARY, 645 BOYLSTON STREET

Atul Gawande



Atul Gawande is a public health researcher and a general and endocrine surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He is also a professor in both the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health and the Department of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, as well as a staff writer for the New Yorker. Gawande’s most recent book is Being Mortal, which examines the limitations of medicine in end-of-life care.
4:00PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
OLD SOUTH SANCTUARY, 645 BOYLSTON STREET

Sarah Kay



Sarah Kay is a poet best known for her award-winning spoken-word poetry. She is the founder and co-director of Project VOICE, a group dedicated to using spoken word as an educational and inspirational tool.
5:30PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
STORYVILLE, 90 EXETER STREET

Brendan Kiely



Brendan Kiely is the author of the young adult novel The Gospel of Winter, which was selected by the ALA as one of its 2015 top ten books for young adults. All American Boys, his new YA novel co-authored with Jason Reynolds, focuses on the broad repercussions of a single violent act.
3:00PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY TEEN CENTRAL, 700 BOYLSTON STREET

Sonia Manzano



Sonia Manzano is an actress, author, and speaker best known for her role as Maria on Sesame Street. She was nominated twice for an Emmy Award as Outstanding Performer in a Children’s Series, and her writing for the show earned her fifteen Emmy Awards. She recently published a memoir, Becoming Maria.
12:00PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY TEEN CENTRAL, 700 BOYLSTON STREET

Kim McLarin



Kim McLarin is the author of the critically-acclaimed novelsTaming It Down, Meeting of the Waters, and Jump at the Sun,which was chosen as a 2007 Fiction Honor Book for the Massachusetts Book Awards. She is also author of the memoir Divorce Dog and co-author of the memoir Growing Up X.
2:30PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
OLD SOUTH MARY NORTON, 645 BOYLSTON STREET

Christopher Muther



Christopher Muther is the Boston Globe’s recently-appointed travel writer and columnist. Over the past year he’s written about cats around the world—from Montreal to Peru to Turkey. When he’s not writing about cats, he’s covering hot new destinations, up-and-coming neighborhoods, and angry people on airplanes.
4:00PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
FRENCH CULTURAL CENTER, 53 MARLBOROUGH STREET

Chinelo Okparanta



Chinelo Okparanta is an award-winning Nigerian-American writer. Her collection of short stories, Happiness, Like Water,was long-listed for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and won a 2014 Lambda Literary Award. Okparanta’s debut novel is Under the Udala Trees.
12:45PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
EMMANUEL PARISH HALL, 15 NEWBURY STREET

Jason Reynolds



Jason Reynolds is the author of several novels, including the critically-acclaimed When I Was the Greatest, which earned him the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award for New Talent. His latest novel, co-written with Brendan Kiely, is titled All American Boys.
3:00PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY TEEN CENTRAL, 700 BOYLSTON STREET

Louis Sachar



Louis Sachar is the Newbery Medal–winning author ofHoles, which was also awarded the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature and was adapted into a 2003 film. Sachar’s most recent novel, Fuzzy Mud, is an environmental cautionary tale that blends suspense and humor.
10:45AM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24
OLD SOUTH SANCTUARY, 645 BOYLSTON STREET


Friday, October 9, 2015

Culture Vulture long weekend!

An epic Culture Vulture weekend!

Fenway "Open Our Doors"

http://fenwayculture.org/still-cant-decide-what-activities-to-take-in-during-ood/


Massachusetts Historical Society Open House
1154 Boylston Street
10 AM to 3 PM
New England Conservatory Presents: The Omer Quartet
2-3pm
Wheelock Family Theatre @ Wheelock College
Monday October 12 at 9:00-10:00am
BACKSTAGE TOURS
Monday October 12 at 11:00-11:50am
Free Performance by WFT’s Story Troupers
Monday October 12 at 1:00-1:45pm
Free Performance by Boston Lyric Opera
Towne Art Gallery @ Wheelock College
Out of Print: Collages and Assemblages Made of Vintage Book Parts
by Conny Goelz-Schmitt
10-2pm
In her work, Conny Goelz-Schmitt explores, deconstructs, and reallocates printed matter to create new objects for the viewer’s mind. Faded colors selected from old tomes remind us of a time long passed. Distorted letters seem to hint at the invention of a new language.




Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Monday, September 28, 2015

Active Reading on "Everyday Use"

Please use Active Reading while you enjoy "Everyday Use"

1) preview
2) interact
3) review

Sign up for ClassZone (instructions in the sidebar) or find a "slightly legal" PDF.

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Weekend of Culture Culture!

This is a wonderful weekend of Culture Vulture in Boston. Here are two key picks:










Beantown Jazz Festival
https://www.berklee.edu/beantownjazz

The Berklee Beantown Jazz Festival is Boston’s biggest block party—a free, annual outdoor concert open to the public that has delighted hundreds of thousands of music lovers over the years with its host of jazz, Latin, blues, funk, and groove performances, along with an array of food vendors and free activities for kids.

This year’s festival, themed “Jazz: The Voice of the People,” will take place from 12:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 26, 2015 at Columbus Avenue between Massachusetts Avenue and Burke Street. Stretching across six blocks in Boston’s historic South End, the festival offers world-class music on three stages, phenomenal food and drink, arts, crafts, and unique gifts. The Natixis Family Park offers facepainting, inflatables, cotton candy, KidsJam, an instrument petting zoo, and more.

BSO in the Park
http://www.bso.org/brands/bso/features/2015-16-bso-season/fall-parks-concert-series.aspx
All performances are from 3pm to 4pm.
In partnership with Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the Boston Parks and Recreation Department.
September 27: Christopher Columbus Park, North End, Boston Pops Brass Quintet
October 4: Savin Hill Park, Boston Cello Quartet
October 11: Copley Square, TBD

In case of inclement weather, please check the BSO website or visit the Boston Symphony Facebook page.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

The Old Man and the Sea: History RASH

1) For our work in the 826 Writers' Room, follow our active reading process (preview, interact, review) for this article: "Hemingway's Cuba, Cuba's Hemingway"

2) The back side of the handout gives historical context to one of the most important allusions in the book: The Virgin of Cobre.

3) Take time to ask questions about your reading. Today is a perfect chance for one-on-one questions and interactions.

4) Bonus! Here's an interview with Ernest Hemingway in Cuba after winning the Nobel Prize. He unpacks the la vs. el article when describing the sea! Epic!



Friday, September 18, 2015

Our film clip to introduce Hemingway, Midnight in Paris


It would make a good Culture Vulture film!

Monday, September 14, 2015

Old Man and the Sea: Reading Calendar!

Listen to each section:
Audiobook Link

September 16
Part 1 (9-22)
“I wanted to take him fishing but I was too timid to ask him. Then I asked you to ask him and you were too timid.” 

September 17 
Part 2 (22-36)
The iridescent bubbles were beautiful. But they were the falsest thing in the sea and the old man loved to see the big sea turtles eating them. 

September 18 
Part 3 (36-50)
When once, through my treachery, it had been necessary to him to make a choice, the old man thought. His choice had been to stay in the deep dark water far out beyond all snares and traps and treacheries. 

September 22
Part 4 (50-62) Part 5 (62-75) Part 6 (75-89) Part 7 (89-101)
If the boy were here he could rub it for me and loosen it down from the forearm, he thought. But it will loosen up.

Then he was sorry for the great fish that had nothing to eat and his determination to kill him never relaxed in his sorrow for him.

The sea had risen considerably. But it was a fair-weather breeze and he had to have it to get home. “I’ll just steer south and west,” he said. “A man is never lost at sea and it is a long island.” 


Sometimes he lost the scent. But he would pick it up again, or have just a trace of it, and he swam fast and hard on the course. 

September 23
Part 8 (101-114)
“Come on, galano,” the old man said. “Come in again.” The shark came in a rush and the old man hit him as he shut his jaws. 

September 24
Part 9 (114-end)
The end.

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Contract with the reader!

Today we made rough draft statement of a class reading contract. Use the link to record your votes for what should be on our reading contract:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/144H_PaJHl2kB9wWp_uRJKTk00eCTQomzh7RKYNbQWGI/viewform?usp=send_form